Nurse Sharks

OK, It’s been a long time since we posted, and the post will probably remain inconsistent, but I have a short story I thought would be fun to share. I entered a tournament today, and one of the requirements was that the army have a story. This is what I entered, a short fluffy story about my Carcharodon/Sisters of Battle list.

Inquisitor Legate read the note again. Having no idea who left it, he did not know how reliable it was. But if it was true, he was greatly concerned. The fact that Inquisitor Aedile wanted to send the Minotaurs to investigate the Carcharodon Astartes based off of complaints from other chapters after the Badab war was a serious issue for Legate. He knew that the Carcharodons were loyal to the Imperium, and he knew that an investigation by the Minotaurs would only end in violence. Legate also had to admit that if the Minotaurs and the Carcharodons went to war with each other, the Minotaurs would probably wipe the Carcharodons from existence.

Inquisitor Legate got up from his chair and started pacing the office. His brow creased with concern. He knew the Carcharodons were loyal. OK, they were a little bit on the violent side, but they were loyal to the Emperor. He had the fact to back him up. Legate also knew that if he went up against Inquisitor Aedile, he would lose. He did not have enough support to go against Aedile’s wishes. But maybe he could pull just enough support to alter them.

Yes, alter them. Maybe if it looked like he was willing to have the Carcharodons investigated it would satisfy Aedile‘s allies in the Inquisition. He knew the Minotaurs would go in and attack. Even sending in the Grey Knights made him uncomfortable. Going in himself would be considered a conflict of interest, no other inquisitor would support him on that decision. Not even his allies…


 

Canoness Cirratu entered the room, leaving her guard outside the door with the two space marines that escorted them. She did not let her disdain at being ordered here show on her face. A few weeks ago she would not have recognized the icon adorning the shoulder pads of the Space Marines. Now she understood that these are Carcharodon Astartes. She walked up to the only marine in the darken room, stopping barley a foot away from him. Looking right into his black eyes, she handed over the documents she was carrying.

The pale marine didn’t say a word as he reached out to grab them. Cirratu felt the need to break the silence. Silence that has been eating at her since she and her squad landed on this ship. “I come with orders from Terra and documents from Lord Tyberos himself. My orders are to observe you and your men and report back with my findings.”

When she was done speaking, the pale space marine stood there in silence for what seems like an hour, but was probably only a few minutes. When he did finally speak, it was with a very quiet voice.

“What did you bring with you?”
“My personal command squad, a squad of my sisters, a Rhino, my personal command tank, and supplies for both you and me. These supplies include some new armour sent directly from Mars.”
“What do you need from us?”
“Billets, a place to train, and I need access to you and you men.”
“Done”

And with that, she knew this meeting was over. She spun on her heels and walked out of the office. As soon as she steeped through the marine on her left spoke.

“Canoness Cirratu, Captain Isurus told me to show you around the ship. We will pick up the rest of your troops and I will show you your billets, our training facilities, and where you can feast. Please follow me.”

While she walked next to these towering behemoths, she thought about how quickly Captain Isurus granted her access. Maybe this wouldn’t be such a bad assignment. She did begin to wonder why she was observing this chapter for the Inquisition. Such a small squad wouldn’t stop them if they fell to chaos, but even being sent showed that someone on Terra didn’t trust them. She would have her troops keep their eyes on these Space Marines…


 

After Canoness Cirratu left is office, he turned to the marine that was hiding in the shadows.

“She didn’t notice you.”
“Not that I can tell.”
“What is your opinion?”
“She comes with orders from Terra and from Lord Tyberos.”
“And?”
“And I still don’t trust her.”
“Have the men keep a watchful eye on her and her team. They may just be here to observe, but Lord Tyberos left a hidden message to keep our eyes out as well. We are not the only ones that are feeling uneasy with these Adepta Soroitas.”

Where did they come from? Where did they go? (Cult Codex Part 2)

Yesterday I wrote a quick summary of the basics of the Cult Codex, today I want to go a little more into some of the special rules. These rules make the codex pretty fluffy, and a lot of fun. However, they are not amazing. Good, but not amazing.

Every unit in the army, excluding vehicles, comes with the Cult Ambush and the Return to the Shadows special rules. These rules, if rolled well, can be bloody mean.

With Cult Ambush, instead of deploying normally, your roll on a table. Yeah, I know, GW loves to make things random, but these are pretty cool. On a 1, you deploy the unit 6 inches from your table edge. On a 2, they are deployed via outflank. On a three, you can set up the unit anywhere on the table that is more then 9 inches away from an enemy unit, but if no enemy unit can draw line of sight you can set them up 6 inches away from an enemy unit. On a 4, you can set up the unit more than 6 inches away from an enemy unit. On a roll of a 5, and here is where is starts getting interesting, you can set them up anywhere on the table that is more than 6 inches away from an enemy unit, and immediately make a bonus shooting attach (so you get to shoot twice). On a roll of a 6, and I love this one, you can set up the unit anywhere on the table providing that it is more than 3 inches away from an enemy unit, and then you can charge the turn they arrive. I used this rule and some genestealers to take out an assault squad in the first turn. This is amazing, providing you go first.

Now, the second special rule makes the first one even more entertaining. Return to the Shadows allows units to leave the board and be placed in ongoing reserves providing that there are no enemy units within 6 inches of the unit. So, the unit can leave and in the next turn, they can roll on the table and come back in an annoying fashion. While this will add even more randomness to the game, and could end up costing you the game if you are not careful, it is a blast.

There is one warlord trait that helps with this. On a six, your warlord gains Ambush Leader, which allows you to choose which result you want to take rather than rolling for it (only with the warlord and his unit). The rest of the traits, while good, are not as great. On a 1, you gain Stealth. On a two, units within 12 inches of the warlord gain counter-attack. On a 3, your warlord gains move through cover, and never suffers an initiative penalty when charging through terrain. On a 4, the warlord gains “It Will Not Die.” And on a 5, the detachment uses his leadership, which is also pretty good, but not as good as choosing to charge on turn one.

The Psychic powers of this codex are good. They are nothing extravagant, but good. The Primus power reduces a target enemy unit’s WS, BS, I, and Attacks by 1. They have a power that gives a unit fleet and relentless, and allows them to charge even if they ran in the same turn. There is a witchfire power that gives them a 24-inch range; blast template shot that is S5 AP3. Another power is a blessing that gives a unit plus 1 strength and rage. The 4th power (not counting the primus) is a roll off. If there is a draw, the enemy unit suffers a -3 penalty to their initiative, if the cult wins, they also suffer wounds with no cover or armour saves allowed. There is also a power that allows the cult player to take control of an enemy unit and shoot is as if it were their own. Finally, there is a summoning power. This varies depending on what warp charge level you decide it is, but you can summon almost any cult troop who then arrives using the cult ambush special rule.

The final item I will cover in my review is a quick summary of the formations. It hurts me to say that the cult has better formations than the Nids, but this should be all that surprising to me, or to anyone else. The codex is newer. It has a Decurion Style detachment.

This detachment, called the Cult Insurrection Detachment, consists of 1 to 6 core formations, 1 or more Auxiliary formations, and 0 to 3 command formations. The detachment gains the ability to reroll the warlord trait IF the patriarch is the warlord (oh, and you cannot have any more than one Patriarch, one Magus, and one Primus in this detachment). All non-vehicle units that gain infiltrate, and if they already have infiltrate, they gain shrouded. The Cult player can add 1 to their reserve rolls (which I usually need) and their opponent subtracts 1 from their reserve rolls. Finally, each time a unit enters ongoing reserves D6 models can be returned to that unit that we already slain in combat. I MUST RUN THIS.

Finally, I am going to give a quick run through of all the formations.

Subterranean Uprising – This formation consists of 0-1 Primus, 1-3 Metamorphs, 2-4 Acolytes, and 0-3 Aberrants. The formation has the infiltrate special rule, must be set up using Cult Ambush but you get to roll two dice and choose, and any unit joined by the Primus gets to roll three dice when rolling on the chart. I like this formation.

Deliverance Broodsurge – 2 to 6 units of Neophytes. All units must take Goliaths as dedicated transports. They must begin the game in the transports but can disembark even if the truck used cruising speed, but they have to take dangerous terrain tests. Also, the trucks ignore crew shaken or crew stunned results, but do lose the hull point. Eh, this one is OK.

Demolition Claw – 2 to 3 units of Acolytes and 2 to 3 units of Rockgrinders. At least one model in each of the hybrids must be equipped with a demolition charge, and the Rockgrinders are also equipped, but for free. The formation gains tank hunter, and the hybrids can reroll the scatter dice when throw a demolition charge. Finally, after the unit throws the charge, if it is within 6 inches of a Rockcrusher, on a 4+ roll, they can replenish the charge.

Brood Cycle – 1 Iconward, 3 Acolytes, 2 Neophytes, 1 Metamorph unit, 1 purestrain genestealer unit, 0 -1 Aberrants, and 0 – 1 Rockcrusher unit. The unit can add +1 to its leadership and weapon skill if it is within 6 inches of another non-vehicle unit. They also have furious charge if they are within 24 inches of the Iconward.

The First Curse – 20 Purestrain genestealers and a Patriarch. With this formation, you roll a D6 and gain the following bonuses. 1 – Flesh Hooks. 2 – 4+ armour save. 3 – Toxic Glands. 4 – Adrenal Sacs. 5 – Preferred Enemy. 6 – Choose one of the options.

Neophyte Cavalcade – 2 Neophyte units, 1 Leman russ Squadron, 1 to 2 units of either Scout Sentinels or Armoured Sentinels. All neophyte units must take a Chimera as a dedicated transport and must start the game embarked in the transport. Vehicles gain outflank except for Scout Sentinels who gain Cult Ambush. All vehicles ignore shaken or stunned results on a 4+, though still lose the hull point.

The Doting Throng – 0-1 Magus, 3 – 6 Neophytes and/or Acolytes (in any combination). Units have Zealot when within 12 inches of the Magus and when Magus is part of a unit, that unit can reroll all failed to hit rolls in every round of close combat. Also, when casting a blessing, the Magus can reroll the test if it failed.

Broodcoven – This formation consists of a Patriarch, a Magus, and a Primus. The three models must be deployed as a single unit. They can join friendly units, but only as a unit, and must leave as a unit. This formation, and a unit they join gain the following rules (providing that the specific model is still alive: Patriarch – Fleet. Magus – Counter Attack. Primus – Preferred Enemy.

That’s all for now.

 

 

 

The Four Armed-Emperor (Genestealer Codex Review part one)

It’s been a long time since I wrote for the blog, and a lot has happened. The biggest thing to happen to me, in terms of Warhammer is the release of the Genestealer Cult codex. I am more excited about this release than any recent release I can think of, including the last Tyranid update. I can’t even explain why I am this excited. I started playing 40K after the Genestealer Cult was discontinued. To me, the Cult was just a myth, something whispered about or reminisced about. But, GW got me excited about a release, so much so that I can now run a 2K army (using the genestealers from my Tyranid army).

My first impression about this army is that it is a glass cannon. Fluff wise, it is fantastic. And if you have some good luck with the dice, you can crush your opponent. However, a few bad rolls and you are going to be fighting an uphill battle.

Today I am just going to cover the units. In a later post, I will cover the special rules, psychic powers, and formations.

HQs –

The Patriarch – A slightly upgraded broodlord. He is a level 1 psyker who can be upgraded to level 2. He can take powers from Biomancy, Telepathy, and Broodmind. His Rending claws have shred and he gives units within the Genestealer Cult Faction fearless if they are within 12 inches of his model. He is strength 6, toughness 5, and has three wounds. He does NOT have an invulnerable save, but he auto passes lookout sir rolls, including in challenges (this will become important later).

Magus – Another level 1 psyker (upgradeable to level 2), and he has access to the same powers that the Patriarch. Units within 12 inches of the Magus gain Adamantium will (which I have to remember when playing). Strength 3, Toughness 3, and 2 wounds, he is not a model you want to get into close combat. He also auto passes look out sir rolls (actually, all HQ options do this, another fact I have to remember).

Primus – The strategist of the cult. Models with 12 inches of the Primus gain hatred. He comes armed with a bonesword, rending claws, toxin injectors (gives close combat weapons poison), and a needle pistol (Poison 2+). He is armed to the teeth. He is a strength 4, toughness 3 unit with 3 wounds. While not being too tough, he is a model, with the proper support, you would not mind getting into close combat.

Acolyte Iconward – The new addition (based off the deathwatch box set release). This little guy carries the Sacred Cult Banner, and is a great model to add to an army. Models within 12 inches gain feel no pain (6+) or if they already have feel no pain, they add 1 to their rolls (so a 4+). The banner also bestows Furious Charge to units within 12 inches. The Iconward won’t hit all that hard himself, but he can make other units a little more survivable, and a little more painful on the charge.

Troops –

There are only two troop options in the Cult codex. Acolyte Hybrids and Neophyte Hybrids. The Acolytes are first and second-generation cultists and are a little better at close combat. They have a higher Strength (4) but a toughness of 3. They also can be equipped with some fun close combat weapons like a rock saw or a rock cutter (both will be covered later).

The neophytes are the 3rd and 4th generation hybrids. These are the ones that can pass as human, or nearly so. These are equipped with autoguns or lasguns. You can choose a few heavy weapon options, and even take a heavy weapons team. These are, all things considered, guard.

Elite –

The elite choices are fun, and very good.

Hybrid Metamorphs – As the hive mind get closer, these random metamorphs begin to appear. They can be equipped with a lot of the same things that regular Tyranids could be equipped with. Scything Talons, claws, whips, and even bone swords. They are obviously meant for close combat. I have yet to try these out (I built Acolytes instead of these guys, but they are on the list). I don’t think they are the best elite choice, but I think they could be fun.

Purestrain Genestealers – Ah, the Genestealers. These pretty boys come in at the same price as the Tyranid Genestealers, but are just a tad better. Not counting their special rules (covered later… this is long enough now), they have some interesting upgrades that make them pretty damn good. They now come with stealth and a 5+ invulnerable save. With their three attacks, and not being more survivable, these guys can put up a fight. Add in the Patriarch, and you give him some models to take wounds.

Abberrants – The mutants of the Cult world. These guys, who are only available through the Deathwatch box set as of this writing) are interesting. Strength of 5, and a toughness of 4, they also come with feel no pain and stubborn. At 30 points a model, they are a bit pricy, but if you can get them into close combat, they will hit hard. Add all the benefits of the HQs, and they could hit like a truck and have a 4+ feel no pain. Not too shabby.

Fast Attack –

Most of the fast attach options come from the Guard codex. You can take Chimeras (sometimes as dedicated transports), Armoued Sentinels, Scout Sentinels, and Goliath Trucks. These bad boys are the Cult Unique transport, and look pretty damn cool. They are not that tough (F11, S10, R10, 3HP), but can get your troops to where they need to be. And being open topped, your troops can assault out of them. They can carry 10 models (no genestealers or Patriarch) and come with a heavy stubber and a twin-linked autocannon.

Heavy Support –

There are only two options, a Leman Russ (not even all of the options) or the Goliath Rockgrinder, which is my personal favorite. The Rockgrinder vehicle has a stat line of BS3, F12, S10, R10, 3HP and comes with a heavy stubber and a heavy mining laser. It can also carry six models. It may be upgraded with a clearance incinerator for 5 points or a Heavy Seismic Cannon for 10 points.

The Heavy Mining Laser stat line is 0-12 inches S8, AP3, Heavy 3, Resonance and from 12-24 inches S5 AP4, Heavy 6, Resonance. Resonance means that to wound rolls and armour pen rolls of 6 are AP1.

The Incenerator is basically a heavy flamer with Torrent. Actually… it is a heavy flamer with Torrent.

The Heavy Mining Laser has a range of 36 inches, and is Strength 9 AP2.

Finally, the Drilldozer Blade. This allows the Rockcrusher to automatically pass Dangerous Terrain Tests. It also adds another D6 to the strength of a ram, and on penetrating hits, adds one to the result of the vehicle damage table.

In a tank shock, the enemy unit takes an initiative test before taking a morale check. If it fails, the unit immediately suffers D3 S10 AP2 hits. If the unit fails to Death or Glory the Rockcrusher it takes an additional D3 S10 AP2 hits. Not too shabby. Not great, but not bad.

That’s all for now. I will continue with the formations and special rules in a lter post. Hopefully not too much later.

 

 

Campaign – just a start

This is going to be a short post today. A fellow legionnaire and I have started a story driven campaign. My Tyranids are invading a planet protected by the Sisters of Battle, the Carcharodons, and some tasty Guard.

The rules are pretty simple, the Nids, being an invasion Hive Fleet, have an unlimited supply of troops. My opponent has very limited troops. The allies that get to the planet before the invasion are all he has. As they die off, they cannot be replaced.

The first mission, which was played today, only involved the Sisters. The story will be told later.

Asking for a Loss

Yesterday I had a game with my Tyranids against the mighty Tau. I asked for the beating I took. I mean that, I literally asked for a competitive game, and was thumped. I knew it was going to happen, but I wanted to see competitive Tau.

image1

The only point when all of my army was on the table.

My list consisted of 2 CADs at 2500 points. Only limitation was I asked for no Lord of War. My list contained the following:

Swarmlord w/ 3 Tyrant Guard
3 Flying Hive Tyrants w/ Brainleech worms
4 Zonathropes w/ Neurothrope (in a Tryannocyte)
Malanthrope
2 Units of 10 Termagants
1 Ripperswarm w/ Deepstrike
1 Mucolid Spore
2 Hive Crones
9 Raveners w/Rending Claws
Exocrine

The Tau list contained the Ghostkeel Formation, The Riptide Formation, Markerlight drones Formation, Breacher squads in transports, Broadsides, stealth suits, and a commander and guards. There were probably other units too, but these are the units that stick out in my mind.

I am not going to do a normal brief summary of what happened, because it was ugly.

The Tau player deployed first, and I was not able to seize the initiative. We had Dawn of War deployment and the Big Guns Never Tire mission. On the roll, we only had three objective markers.

In the Tau player’s first round of shooting, the beating commenced. He killed both Hive Crones. Slaughtered 2 of the Hive Guard (and wounded the third). Put three wounds on of the Flying Hive Tyrants (the Warlord). He slaughtered six of the nine Raveners. The Malanthrope was dead. I could cover what I did, but not much happened. I got feel no pain off on a couple of units, and wounded some Tau, but not much else happened.

image4

Deadpile turn 1.

Turn Two continued the beating. Two of the three Flying Hive Tyrants were put down (including the Warlord). Relatively speaking, this was the least painful turn since that was all they my opponent killed. However, it still was painful. All of my reserves entered the game. Maybe how I would have a chance.

Nope, I managed to accomplish very little in this turn. This was due to some poor rolling on my part, and some good rolling on my opponents.

It just went down hill from here. I had nothing for the Tau. In fact, by turn 6 I was tabled (at least I lasted that long). It was just an ugly ugly game. This is not to say I didn’t have fun. I did, I had a blast. I just had nothing to bring against this army. I did kill some units, but it wasn’t much. A few wounds on the Ghostkeels, a broadside, some of the commander’s squad. I did have some success, but not a lot.

Orks v Tyranids – Nid Perspective

So, now that we have seen my list and deployment here, I am going to get into the actual game. *I apologize, I am writing this a week late, and I am not sure I am 100% correct on the following*

Right off the bat, I opted not to try and seize the initiative. My logic was that if I move forward, I would have limited shooting, and everything would have to run forward. This would put me in a position to get charged on turn one. If I let Severus go first, I might be in a position to get a charge off in the first turn with the Raveners.

Turn 1 –
Severus did the Orky thing and quickly moved forward. It was actually a little scary seeing that many ork vehicles head in my direction. He did get off some shooting, killing one of the two biovores and a couple of hormaguants, but he mostly seemed to use that turn in order to get into a position where he could charge and protect some of his more important units.

In my turn, I moved into a position to start getting charges off. My Raveners made a move towards the Warboss and his Squad. Swarmlord slowly moved forward (because that is what he does). The HT and the Hive Crone headed towards the nearest ork vehicles.

In the psychic phase I got Catalyst off and gave feel no pain to the Swarmlord and the Raveners. I reduced the Warbosses BS and WS. Finally, the Zoanthropes blew up a Trukk, giving me first blood.

09 Nid Center Flank

In the shooting phase, my Biovore bombed the unit of Gretchen (killing all but 2), the Exocrine shot at another Trukk, the Hive Crone burned some boys in a pair of vehicles (not many, I caused 1 wound in one and 4 in the other). But mostly I ran units forward that would not have been able to get off a charge.

In the assault phase, I had the Raveners charge the bikes. While I did get a few wounds on them, killing 2, Severus caused more to the Raveners, killing three of them. However, I was fearless, so I was just happy getting them tied up.

15 Turn 1 over

Turn 2 –
In Turn two, only one of the three Ork flyers entered the game from reserves. Severus positioned some boys to charge the Raveners. More of his boys were put into a place where they could shoot and charge the Zoanthropes. In the shooting phase he killed the Hive Crone (which was a significant loss for me) and caused me to jink the Flying HT.

In the assault phase, the boys charged the Raveners, and proceeded to slaughter most of them. The other boys failed their charge on the Zoanthropes.

In my Turn two, I continued to move forward. The Carnifexes continued to try to get into a position where they could do something (that was a theme for them through this game). The Swarmlord again didn’t move that far forward. At this point in time, I was just trying to get him into combat with the Warboss. But the fact that the boss was on a bike, and that the Swarmlord does not have fleet (plus my move through cover rolling was terrible), I was not having any luck catching him.

In the shooting phase, the Pyrovores managed to kill off some boys (that were no longer in combat since they killed the Raveners), so they were actually productive.

I sent more troops into combat, trying to tie up and kill some boys. While it worked, it didn’t work as well as I had hoped.

18 Turn 1 Over

Turn 3 –

In Turn three, another one of the Ork jets came in on the table. And this time, after some serious firepower, a failed grounding check, and a charge from the Warboss, the Flying HT was brought down and killed. I also lost more little bugs and one of the pyrovores (which did not explode). The Warboss consolidated away from me, making the swarmlord have to go even further.

In my turn, the Swarmlord continued to try and run down the Warboss. Actually, most of my units were trying to get into better positions. I didn’t have anything to deal with the flyers, so I proceeded to ignore them except for the random snapfire from the Exocrine (and he always failed to cause any damage). Malanthrope and Carnifex units continued to try and position themselves differently. By this time the Hormaguants and one of the Termagant units were very much reduced in size. Even the second Termagant unit was reduced. I was taking losses left and right.

25 Turn 3

Turn 4 –

Severus used his turn four to try and rack up some kill points. One flyer shot at the Malanthrope and killed it. The warboss charged into combat with the left flank Termaguants in order to support the boys that were tied up.

Turn 4 is where I realized that if I were ever going to catch the Warboss, I would have to sacrifice my Zoanthropes. I put them into a position to charge into the combat that the Warboss was in. A couple of Termagants wouldn’t hold out long enough. The Thropes, while terrible in close combat, are survivable with a 3+ invulnerable save. The Warboss slaughtered the Neurothrope in close combat, and I took more losses, but the Warboss could not get away. The Swarmlord was going to get him.

30 Turn 3

Turn 5 –

The turns picked up the pace as the game went on, but that because both Severus and I were taking heavy losses. But turn 5 was the hardest for Severus. He did complete some shooting, took out a few small units, but he was taking a beating. He charged the exocrine (after taking off some wounds with a flyer) but lost combat. He killed a more of the Zoanthrope unit, but not enough to flee. And that is when the Swarmlord charged in a killed the boss in a challenge. From there his game collapsed completely.

35 Turn 4

 Turn five was the first turn where the Carnifexes were able to do anything. They charged and destroyed a battlewagon. The game did go on to a turn 6, but by this time there was not much left in either one of us. The Tyranids feasted on a lot of Orks. And I have to say, the new detachment that the Orks have is not one of the better ones.

34 Turn 4

Orks v Tyranids List and Set Up – Nid Perspective

This past Thursday, I was privileged enough to get another game in against Professor Severus and his Orks at Moxie Games. I was down in Alabama for his wedding, and the Tyranids unwillingly made the trip with me. We were discussing this game for a while and I settled in on the following 2500-point list.

01 Nid Army

HQ –
Swarmlord (Warlord)
3 Tyrant Guards
Flying Hive Tyrant w/ devourers w/ Brainleech worms

Troops –
30 Termagants
30 Termagants
30 Hormaguants

Elite –
Malanthrope
2 Pyrovores
4 Zoanthropes and 1 Neurothrope

Fast –
Hive Crone
9 Raveners w/ Rending Claws

Heavy –
2 Biovores
2 Carnifexes w/ Adrenal Glands and Scything Talons
Exocrine

02 Nid Army

I felt this list brought some solid synapse creatures, a pair of flying MCs to deal with flyers, large numbers of troops, and some solid blast templates. Ok, I had two pyrovores, but they look good. I brought the Carnifexes for some tank killing ability, although I am not used to running them in pairs.

For psychic powers, the Swarmlord had Catalyst, Psychic Scream, and Horror. The HT had Psychic Scream and Paroxysm. The Zoanthrops had Warp Blast/Lance and Onslaught. Of course, they all had Donimion as well.

05 Nid Deployment

We decided on a kill-points game, and had the Dawn of War deployment. The professor won the roll off and deployed first. You will be able to read his list and perspective, but the short version is that he had a unit of bikes (with his warlord and a painboy), a bunch of boys in trukks and battlewagons, and three flyers.

09 Nid Center Flank

On my left flank, I deployed the Exocrine, a unit of termagants, and the Zoantrhopes to shore up my psynapse on that side. Zoanthropes, while terrible in close combat (and have no shooting) are very survivable. I didn’t think I would need to worry about them. In the center, I had the Biovores in terrain, the Swarmlord, the hormaguants, and the other termagant unit. This gave me a solid center. On my right flank I placed the flying HT and the Hive Crone in terrain, along with the Raveners, Malanthrope, and the Carnifexes (which was a poor decision on my part). The Carnifexes were all the way to the right flank and spent most of the game trying to get into a useful position.

08 Nid Left Flank

06 Nid Deployment

The Malanethrope gave cover saves to that flank nicely, including the Swarmlord (although just barely). The Crone and the HT had a nice 2+ cover save, making sure that they would make it to the next round.

Six Thousand Points

Shorereaper here, and I am in a state of shock. Today while waiting for my work computer to reboot for the third time, I decided to see how many points of fully painted Tyranids I could field if I chose too. Now, this is presuming unbound, and was more of a moment to see what I have done. Six thousand points. Let me say that again. I have six thousand points fully painted. And that’s not even including upgrades (except for some wings on Tyrants). Here is the list:

HQ:
Swarmlord
1 Hive Tyrant
3 Flying Hive Tyrants
Old One Eye
Tervigon
3 Tyrant Guards

Elites:

Haruspex
Malanthrope
Maleceptor
2 Pyrovores
Venomthrops
4 Zoanthropes
Neurothrope

Brain Bug!

Brain Bug!

Troops:
30+ Genestealers
2 Broodlords
30 Hormagaunts
60+ Termaguants (half with special weapons)
9 Warriors

Wings!

Wings!

Fast:
Dimachaeron
39 Gargoyles
2 Hive Crones
9 Raveners
3 Spore Mines

Heavy:
2 Biovores
2 Carnifexes
Exocrine
Trygon Prime

Lord of War:
Hierodule

The lone firewarrior tries to delay the hierodules inevitable charge

Holy crap that is a lot of models. And all of that doesn’t even incude my unpainted and unbuilt models. I may have a problem.

And no, I do not have a photo of them all. I don’t have the time (or space) to put them all out. But one day, I must take pictures of this.

Sorry for the short post, but I just wanted this in writing.

Building Towards a List

As many of you know, I have been putting a lot of time into my Alpha Legion as of late. However, with my mild ADHD, I haven’t even been able to concentrate on one list to build towards. I am a big fan of play testing which is why I bought outriders and a javelin without ever using them. So, after some thought, I decided to build one 2500-point list, using the “Coils of the Hydra” Rites of War, and work on completing that list specifically.

Now, in this list there is no Primarch, since Forgeworld has not produced a model yet. And don’t get me started that we have seen a model of Russ, and not even a hint of Alpharius. Also, what I like about this list, is that it is easy for me to switch out other units. For now (which will probably change before I actually post this), this is what I have:

 Dynat

HQ:
Armillus Dynat
Exodus (No model, I will have to come up with something)
Legion Centurion (Saboteur) w/ Artificer Armour, Combat Augment Array

Iron Saboteur

Saboteur for when I play against the Iron Hands

Troops:
10 Man Tactical Squad w/ Rhino
10 Man Tactical Squad w/ Rhino
10 Man Tactical Squad w/ Rhino
8 Man Support Squad w/ Meltas, Rhino

Melta

Elites:
Apothecary w/ Artificer Armour
Darkwing Storm Eagle (“Borrowed” from the Raven Guard)

Fast Attack:
10 Man Headhunter w/ Combi-bolters, banestrike ammunition, heavybolter
Javelin Attack Speeder w/ Multi-Melta

Heavy Bolter Headhunter

Heavy Bolter Headhunter

Heavy Support:
Fire Raptor Gunship w/ Autocannon batteries, Armoured Ceramite
Land Raider Phobos w/ Multi-Melta, Armoured Ceramite, Auxiliary Drive

I plan to have Dynat, the Apothecary, and the support squad ride in the Land Raider. I could also place a Tac Squad, the Headhunters, or nothing in the Darkwing, depending on my mood or needs for the day. I have never used Exodus, so I am interested in how he will work, and putting him with the Headhunters seems to be the most logical place (rather than have him run around on his own).

I also like this list because I could easily swap units out. I could easily drop Exodus and the Javelin freeing up a lot of points. Also, if I drop the rites of war, I could reduce my army by dropping the Darkwing and a unit of Tactical Marines.

Finally, what do I have to get and build to run this list? Well, I need an Exodus model, which I may use a Recon Squad model until an actual character model is released, and I need one more Rhino. I have to build the Fire Raptor and the Storm Eagle, since I now have both of those.

This list brings some fluff, some punching power, a little too much air power (one flyer is usually enough), and the ability to hold some objectives. The Javelin (with outflank, deepstrike, and it’s speed) can be used to support troops in need.

 

First Game of KoW

This past Friday I got my first game in of Kings of War. I player the Dark Elves… I mean the Twilight Kin against the owner of Critical Hit Games and his army (which I have since forgotten what they were). The game would have gone a lot faster if I had any idea of what I was doing (and yes, I glanced at the rule book) but this was meant to be a teaching game. I can’t say that I played with any strategy, or any thought at all other than learning the game. It was relatively quick, fairly easy, and a decent substitute for Warhammer Fantasy. It’s a closer substitute than Age of Sigmar is in my opinion.

I enjoyed the game, so much so that I have already started gluing models to their movement trays for ease of transport and fielding.

Getting there

I also got to use the Kharibdyss for the first time, although in this game it was just a Hydra that didn’t last all that long. And since I used the Kharibdyss, I decided that maybe I should think about painting him.

Hydra

I would recommend people looking for a Fantasy alternative to give KoW a try. It’s not a perfect replacement, but if you are not a fan of AoS, KoW isn’t bad at all. Sorry for the short post for today.

This is Shorereaper, signing off.