That Guy

This weekend I played a game against a chaos player whom I consider a friend. As we were setting up, I asked him about his list, knowing what I was planning on taking in my Tyranid list. However, after he gave me a rundown, I realized certain units I was planning on taking he would struggle against. Namely, I knew he would struggle against my Flying Hive Tyrant and my Hive Crone. The list was monster heavy, but it did have some units that I consider not very good (Raveners), but he decided to not take any anti-flyers in list.

After I told him that I was going to switch up my list, he told me not to. He wanted to see how his list matched up as it was. I actually felt a little guilty. Sure, there were some units of his that I did not know how they would do against me. I never faced most of his army, so I didn’t really know what it was capable of. However, I knew which units of mine would struggle against.

While he did kill my Tervigon pretty easily (turn two the latest), my Carnifex blew through his unit of chariots. The Flying Hive Tyrant slowly picked off a few units, but was basically untouched by the end of the game. The Hive Crone was killed in the last turn, but only because I put him on the ground to get a few more kill points. The Swarmlord and the Zoanthropes we very useful, causing his to take a lot of leadership tests.

But what this comes down to is that I hate being that guy. I want to play competitive games. Yes, I want to win, but I want competitive games. I don’t want a game that ends with my opponent having only two models left on the table. I want games that are close, games that come down to the final turn.

Yes, I realize in this case my opponent asked to face my more competitive list, and while I do not consider the list I played as very competitive, it was a strong list. I prefer to write my lists to my opponents. I’ve written lists where I was on the other side of being tabled, and I hated it. If my opponent has not flyers, and no real anti-flyer, I will drop them from my list and add other units.

I want my opponents to have fun. I want to have fun. A competitive loss is still more fun to me than a dominant win. I do not want to be that guy who only brings competitive lists and enjoys the suffering of my opponents.

Testing Tournament Ork List – It Feels Good to Waaagh

Howdy everyone, Severus here.  In my last article, I talked about two lists I had wrote for a small tournament coming up in a few weeks.  I had a chance to sit down and play a few games this weekend.  I decided to use the following list.  I felt like it was the most flexible list I could write, plus I love trukk boyz.

  • Combined Arms Detachment
    • Mek, Slugga and Choppa (joins ‘Eavy armor boys)
    • Big Mek, ‘Eavy Armor, Kustum Force Field
    • Grukk Face Rippa (joins ‘Eavy armor boyz)
    • 2 Mega Nobz with kombi-skorcha and Boss Mega Nob with 2 kill saws, trukk
    • 11 Tankbustas with Boss Nob (rides in a battle wagon)
    • 15 boyz with slugga, choppa, and ‘Eavy armor, Nob with power klaw and ‘Eavy armor (rides in a battlewagon)
    • 11 boys with slugga and choppa, nob with power klaw and boss pole, trukk
    • Deffkopta with twin-linked rokkits
    • Deffkopta with twin-linked rokkits
    • Deffkopta with twin-linked rokkits
    • Battlewagon with big shoota
    • Battlewagon with big shoota
    • 3 mek guns with traktor kannons
  • Combined Arms Detachment
    • Pain Boy (joins mega nobz)
    • Pain Boy (joins ‘Eavy armor boys)
    • 11 boys with slugga and choppa, nob with power klaw and boss pole, trukk
    • 11 boys with slugga and choppa, nob with power klaw and boss pole, trukk
    • 11 boys with slugga and choppa, nob with power klaw and boss pole, trukk

The first game was against Shorereaper’s nids.  We ended up playing a crusade mission with 4 objectives and dawn of war deployment.  I won’t give you the full play by play, just the high points.  The tractor cannons were awesome!  They managed to ground two FMC next to mobs of boyz.  When they weren’t knocking guys out of the sky, they were forcing them to jink.  Combine them with the tankbustas and deffkoptas and I was hunting gown FMC pretty effectively.

As for the trukk boyz, they did a great job of getting out there and making a mess of things.  They worked well in terms of mobility, allowing me to re deploy quickly and throw more bodies at any problems I was having.  They felt much more flexible than one solid mob (green tide style).

The mega nobz were a bit of a disappointment in this game.  They went hunting a tervigon and instead got bogged down in a mass of termagaunts.  They would win combat every time, but always loose a wound or two in the process.  Those damn little bugs were fearless, so I got tarpited to death.

In the end, the orks took the game.  We were sitting on two objectives to my opponents one with slay the warlord and line breaker.  A good showing considering the nids had two flyrants, two crones, an exorcine, a tervigon, a brood of zoanthropes, and a tyrnanofex in the list.

The next game I played was against Augusta’s Minotaur force.  Mission wise, we rolled up the relic with vanguard deployement.  In terms of stand out units for this list, the mega nobz were awesome.  They managed to get a turn one charge off on a 10 man unit of assault marines with a chaplain and killed all of them in one round of fighting.  That was some awesome rolling!

The tankbustas were amazing once again.  They managed to take down a stormraven that went into hover mode with one round of shooting.  The poor tractor cannons were shot to death with stupid hellfire rounds from the sternguard.

The trukk boyz were the stand out here.  Turn two I was able to basically set all of them up in a bubble around the relic.  I manage to assault and kill just about everything that got too close to the relic.  That gave Grukk and his mob the chance to hop in and grab the relic and get out.  The mobility of these units is what makes them work.

In the end, I held the relic and first blood.  Victory for the orks!

Overall I am happy with this list.  It has some amazing mobility.  It allows me to redeploy my units to where I need them to be effective.  Then I can overwhelm key points in the enemy force.  For now, I think I am going to stick with this list.

That’s it for today.  Until next time this is Severus saying have a good one and take it easy.

My Answer to Centurions

I know this seems obvious by now, but the Shield of Baal Tyranid Supplement (let’s be honest, the first book is a Tyranid supplement) brought a fantastic answer to the Space Marine Centurions armed with grav weapons. I have struggled against the Centurions for the past few months, usually because of bad tactics on my part, and just forgetting what they can do. For example, a unit of four took out the Swarmlord and all three of his guard (that’s eleven wounds right there) in the first turn of a game I was playing. Now I admit that most of that was my fault, keeping the unit in the open, running them into range of the Centurions, but I have lost multiple games thanks to that unit. I’ve seen games where Centurions actually won the game for my opponent; he wouldn’t have needed anything else in the army except to distract me. I have a history of struggling against them; I fear them.

However, the Shield of Baal gave me hope. Now I can take a unit of 5 Zoanthropes and one Neurothrope (the DOOOOOM of Malan’tai replacement). This unit can force the Centurions to take a leadership test on 3D6, causing a wound for every point the test was failed by thanks to Spirit Leach. These wound points also give the Zoanthrope Brood extra dice to manifest Warp Blast. And here we get into the goods. Warp Blast has the lance attack that is S10, AP2. This ignores the Centurion’s armour and thanks to doubling them out, kills them instantly. Centurions, with Grav Weapons, will be wounding the Zoanthropes on 5’s, but the Zoanthropes get their 3+ invulnerable save.

thrope

I will admit, there are some issues. Not only does the Spirit Leach actually have to hit its target, you also have to hit with the Warp Lances as well. The Brood comes with a ballistic skill of 4, so you are hitting above 50%. Now, since this is a brood, I would just dump the extra dice (and maybe some other dice) into getting off the warp lances. I would risk the perils, just to guarantee a successful warp lance casting. Also, other units can easily double out the Zoanthropes, meaning they are not indestructible. Finally, this unit can get expensive (50 points per model and a 25 point upgrade).

But how do I get this unit into the correct position? Well, Shield of Baal comes to the rescue again. Another unit out of this supplement is a Tyranid version of a Drop Pod, the Tyrannocyte. This can drop the Zoanthrope Brood where it is needed, admittedly on Turn 2 or later, but it is a risk I am willing to take. Plus, this is an armed and mobile drop pod, making it slightly better (though not much) than a drop pod. Plus it can fire all five of its weapons at the nearest enemy units within each weapon’s line of site.

Is this the best solution? Maybe not. But you do get a solid unit of psykers who are survivable. You get another synapse unit. You have a great invulnerable save, which very few Tyranis units have. You get a S5 AP3 blast attack or a S10 AP2 Lance attack. While this may not be the best answer to my problems, I do enjoy having a unit of 4 to 5 of them in my lists.

Another Go at a Competitive Ork List

Howdy everyone, Severus here.  I have been in an ork mode lately.  Lots of new models acquired, working on painting more boyz, and trying new lists.  Our local game store, Critical Hit, is hosting a tournament at the end of the month of April.  In previous tournament, I have ran tau and iron hands.  I finally think my orks are at a place where they can be competitive.  I have two lists I would like to talk about today.

First up, the tournament format.  Ultimately, a lists performance depends on the setup of the missions and restrictions on building a force.  List restrictions are 1850 points, army comprised of no more than 2 sources, lords of war are allowed, forgeworld is allowed.   It is a smaller tournament, and in order to get it done in a day, they are planning on 3 rounds.  Round one will be the relic with hammer and anvil deployment.  Round two will be crusader (with 4 objectives) and vanguard strike deployment.  Round three will be the scouring with dawn of war deployment.  All ties are decided by kill points.  All rules questions refer to the independent tournament circuit faq.

So, with all that nonsense out of the way, on to our first list.  This list is based around the popular green tide formation.

  • Green Tide
    • 10 boyz with slugga and choppas, nob with power klaw
    • 10 boyz with slugga and choppas, nob with power klaw
    • 10 boyz with slugga and choppas, nob with power klaw
    • 10 boyz with slugga and choppas, nob with power klaw
    • 10 boyz with slugga and choppas, nob with power klaw
    • 10 boyz with slugga and choppas, nob with power klaw
    • 10 boyz with slugga and choppas, nob with power klaw
    • 10 boyz with slugga and choppas, nob with power klaw
    • 10 boyz with slugga and choppas, nob with power klaw
    • 10 boyz with slugga and choppas, nob with power klaw
    • Warboss with ‘Eavy Armor and Power Klaw
  • Combined Arms Detachment
    • Mek, slugga and choppa
    • Grukk Face Rippa
    • Mad Dok Grotsnik
    • 10 boyz with shootas
    • 10 boyz with shootas
    • 3 deffkoptas with twin linked rockets
    • 4 deff koptas with twin linked rockets
    • 3 tracktor kannons

The idea with this list it to throw the mek, Grukk, and Mad Dok into the green tide.  Mad Dok makes them fearless and feel no pain.  Grukk is awesome in combat with his one re roll to hit and a shred power klaw. The mek is there to soak up a challenge.  All in all, the green tide has 11 strength 8 power klaw models and 2 strength 10 power klaw models.  That is a lot of damage out put.  In terms of defense, it is 130 toughness 4 wounds with feel no pain and 6+armor.  The other boys are meant to try to hold some objectives.  The mek gunz try to deal with any flyers.  The deffkoptas are for popping armor.  The green tide deals with anything else.  Overall the list has 19 kill points (the green tide gives up 11 kill points if it is completely destroyed)

Here is my concerns with that list.  One, it has very limited ability to score objectives (since the green tide can only hold one objective).  In a game like the relic, the green tide will rock.  Otherwise I am going to be hard pressed to score anything at the end of the game since my other units are so small and a smart opponent will target them quickly.  I am also worried about fatigue.  I have not played a green tide in a tournament setting.  I know it is time consuming to move and sort out combat.  I am not sure I can get through three games in a day with it without much fatigue.

So, for my second list, I tried to write something that I am more familiar with.  I also tried to make a faster more maneuverable list.

  • Combined Arms Detachment
    • Mek, Slugga and Choppa (joins ‘Eavy armor boys)
    • Big Mek, ‘Eavy Armor, Kustum Force Field
    • Grukk Face Rippa (joins ‘Eavy armor boyz)
    • 2 Mega Nobz with kombi-skorcha and Boss Mega Nob with 2 kill saws, trukk
    • 11 Tankbustas with Boss Nob (rides in a battle wagon)
    • 15 boyz with slugga, choppa, and ‘Eavy armor, Nob with power klaw and ‘Eavy armor (rides in a battlewagon)
    • 11 boys with slugga and choppa, nob with power klaw and boss pole, trukk
    • Deffkopta with twin-linked rokkits
    • Deffkopta with twin-linked rokkits
    • Deffkopta with twin-linked rokkits
    • Battlewagon with big shoota
    • Battlewagon with big shoota
    • 3 mek guns with traktor kannons
  • Combined Arms Detachment
    • Pain Boy (joins mega nobz)
    • Pain Boy (joins ‘Eavy armor boys)
    • 11 boys with slugga and choppa, nob with power klaw and boss pole, trukk
    • 11 boys with slugga and choppa, nob with power klaw and boss pole, trukk
    • 11 boys with slugga and choppa, nob with power klaw and boss pole, trukk

The idea is that I have two really good combat units, the mega nobz and grukk with the ‘Eavy armor boys.  Both units have feel no pain.  Depending on the opponent, I can put the kustom force field mek in the ‘Eavy amor boys or tankbustas to give there battle wagon some protection or the mek gunz to give them some protection.  The tankbustas are great at popping tanks (duh) and any knights that come around.  The deffkoptas are single man units to run around and hide, then try to score at the end.  The trukk boyz either jump on easy targets or run around hiding and try to score at the end.  All in all, this list has 23 kill points.  The biggest benefit though is it’s 9 units with objective secured and good mobility.

The problems I have with it are that all those trukk boyz are pretty easy to kill.  They can deal some damage, but really can not take a punch.  A good shooting army would have a field day with them if I don’t have enough cover.  Mission wise I also think this army will struggle with the relic and give up a few extra points in the scouring.

Overall, I am torn.  Both lists have there advantages and disadvantages.  Deep down in the depth of my orky heart, I think the green tide list is more competitive.  Honestly though, I am not in that tournament to win it.  I just want the orks to make a good showing for themselves.  What do you guys think?  Give me some feedback.  I will try to get some test games in with these lists. Until next time, this is Severus saying have a good one and take it easy.

New Model Syndrome

Howdy everyone, Severus here.  I wanted to talk today about a common occurrence, New Model Syndrome.  We have all seen it in one form or another.  In short, it is when we have a new model or unit that we have been dying to play with.  When that model hits the table it usually dies in a horrific manner early in the game.  Our gaming group had three instances of this craziness in one afternoon this weekend.

First up, my beloved meganobz.  I got these guys a few weeks ago and have them built, magnetized, and primed.  I am not a stickler about playing only painted models, so I threw them in for there first game against blood angels.  Turn one this unit managed to get in range to charge a baal predator (that was about to burn up my whole left flank).  Need a 7 inch charge, rolled a six.  Even ‘Ere we go couldn’t save them.  They promptly died to three inferno pistol shots.  Three hits, three wounds, no save, doubled them out.  So I sadly put them back in my dead model tray.

Up next, my opponents unit of Sanguinary Guard.  He had just finished painting them.  He doesn’t play unpainted models, so this was their first game.  After seeing off the meganobz with some amazing shooting, they were charged by some boyz and Grukk Faceripper.  The guard themselves killed 2 boys.  Then they lost 9 guard to boyz and Grukk.  That left Dante and one guard left, who promptly hit and ran away.  That combat went the exact opposite way everyone thought.

After these two events happened back to back I declared to the other gamers that all new models will die in a fire if they play them today.  Shorereaper did not heed my warning.  He wanted to try out his new sporocyst against the lord primarch’s ultramarines.  I joked that the primarch would kill it turn one with bolters.  Guess what happened.  Died to bolter fire from bikes and a storm bolter on a drop pod.

I could go on.  Plenty of us have stories about similar event. It seems the harder we work on a new model the more spectacular the death.  I had a conversion I worked on end up having the building he was standing on get blown up and he fell to his death back in 6th edition.  The good part is that once these models die, they seem to get over there bad luck.

How about you guys?  Have you seen new model syndrome rear it’s ugly head before?  Share some stories.  Until next time this is Severus saying have a good one and take it easy.

Weekend in Review – Shorereaper

Another weekend, and another four 40K games played. This weekend was a weekend of one win and three significant losses. Two of the three losses were so bad that if I didn’t concede, I would have been tabled. In fact, one game was so bad that by the end of turn four, there were only four marines left on the table. They were in four different units, but still, only four marines.

The first game I played was with my Carcharodons against the Lord Primarch’s Necrons. My list was a very non-competitive list, and between that, some very poor tactical decisions, and my rolling, I had a very unlucky game. For example, Tyberos managed to kill two Necron warriors, and nothing else. And one of those warriors was killed by orbital bombardment. The second was killed in close combat, and that was all she wrote. I may have killed a few more models with the rest of my Army, but I do not think I even removed a complete unit. The Primarch’s Destroyer Overlord was nearly undestroyable. So, in the end, my Carcharodons did not have a good showing.

The second game, which was at Critical Hit, was that same Carcharodon list against some Tau. This game went much better for the Space Sharks, thanks to some poor reserve rolling by my opponent and another soft Tau list (yes, it is possible). For example, his Riptide didn’t come onto the board until turn four. A deepstriking unit of stealth suits misshaped, allowing me to place them in a position where it took two turns to get into a position where they would be able to do any good, and by that time I had it knocked down to just one model. This allowed me to rack up some easy kill points before the serious firepower game into play, and by the end of the game I had 7 victory points more than my opponent. And Tyberos actually did some work in this battle! He tore through some sniper drones, a hammerhead tank, and a unit of fire warriors. Not much, but much more than the two Necron warriors in Friday’s game.

The Third game I got in was my Tyranids against the Lord Primarch and his Ultramarines. I wrote a friendly list that was intended to try out my Sporocyst for the first time. My opponents list was also pretty soft, but by the end of turn one, I knew I was in for a struggle anyway. His bike squad (and one final bolter shot) managed to take out the cyst in turn one, so I didn’t even get to try out the new unit. His alpha stike and the rest of his army managed to collapse my entire left flank except for one lone Broodlord. My Raveners were cut in half, as well as my Hive Guard. My Exocrine was dead, as was the Sporocyst (which was the only unit on the right flank that was killed. Immediately I was facing an entirely new game, reacting to his deployment rather than being able to play offensively. I didn’t even make it into turn three without feeling that the game was lost. What I learned, or more accurately confirmed, is that taking 6 Raveners and 9 Warriors is not really a good plan, which was again confirmed in my fourth game.

The fourth game had my soft list of Nids face off against some Grey Knights, and again, it went badly. The Dreadknight, which I admit I was nervous about, killed my Exocrine, and then died. A unit of Palidins faced off against my Trygon Prime, and did kill it after a few turns. In a last ditch effort for some points I landed my Flying Hive Tyrant, which promptly died giving my opponent another objective and slay the warlord, which lead to me conceding again.

So, four games, three poor showings.

At least I know I can write a soft list.

Four Units of Sharks

As I have repeatedly stated, one of my many armies is the Carcharodon chapter of the space marines. This army, while not played much, has a special place in my heart. I was introduced to this chapter thanks my good friend, the Lord Primarch, and while it doesn’t see the tabletop time it used to, I still enjoy playing it. I usually field a very elite list when I play the sharks for fluff reasons. While I may change my list up almost every time I play them, there are four units that are almost always in my lists. In this blog I will briefly cover each and introduce you to a character of my own creation.

Carcharodons_Banner

First, of course, is Tyberos, the Red Wake, Chapter Master of the Carcharodons. Tyberos is not really all that special. Sure, he brings some interesting tweaks to a Space Marine chapter, but he is not all that different from a regular Chapter Master from the space marine codex. He comes in at 190 points and is basically armed with a powerfist, a lightning claw, and terminator armour. I did a much more in-depth coverage in an earlier blog, so I will not get into all of his abilities here. And while I say that he is not all that special, I use him all the time, and usually he dies in my game. But he is a fun character, and he brings the second unit that I almost always bring.

Tyberos

Tyberos makes a terminator assault squad with lightning claws available as a troop choice. In the fluff, this is his bodyguard, and I cannot leave home without them. I usually take a unit of seven with a land raider as a dedicated transport. The downside to all of this is that one unit is taking up 545 points, or just over a quarter of my total points in my 2K point army. Not that I want to sell terminators short, they are a solid unit, but they are an expensive unit. This unit, being a troop choice, also gives me access to an objective secured landraider, which has not come into play all that often, but it is nice to know I have. A vehicle with armour values of 14 all around is still a tough nut to crack.

The third unit I tend to field is Isurus, Captain of the Second Company, and here we have the character of my own creation. While I do not have a back-story to him yet, I am working on it. He is standard captain on a bike, so I do not need to go through his stat line, but I have equipped him with the “Might of the Lamniforms” which is a melee weapon that hits at +2 Strength, is AP 3, and has rampage and strikedown. This is a version of the Teeth of Terra, meaning it is just as restricted as that weapon. This captain has actually been the hero of many games. Even when the unit he has joined has been eliminated, he has managed to pull out a win for me. Maybe it’s the artificer armour.

Isurus

Isurus, being a Captain on a bike, frees up the final unit that is almost always in my lists. I love taking a full unit of bikes (if not two) in my Marine list as a troop choice. The speed and variety of weapon options that a full unit brings to the table is usually worth it to me. And again, having objective secured, while not always necessary, is nice to have in your back pocket.

So, there you go, the standard four units in my 2K-point army lists. And those 4 units take up just over half of my points. Like I said earlier, I run a fairly elite army, but it is a fun army for me, even if I do not win with them as often as I win with my Tyranids.

Shorereaper, signing off….

tzitzimitl - air demon

Severus’ Guide to Magnetizing!

Howdy everyone!  Severus here and today I want to talk about magnets!  I love them and use them on everything. Infantry, monstrous creatures, vehicles, flyers, bikes, you name it, I can magnetize it (and probably have).  I use them for all kinds of purposes, but the most common is to allow a particular model the option to switch armament.  Today I wanted to give you guys a tutorial on the common techniques I use when magnetizing models.

In my experience, the easiest thing to magnetize is a vehicle. Of those the landraider is a great example.  It can have 3 different weapon options and uses several different methods to get all those parts on there.  I just so happen to have picked up a use redeemer/crusaider this weekend and thought it would be a great chance to make a demo of it.

20150301_070418In terms of supplies, this is what you will probably need on hand.  Obviously magnets, I used 1/8th inch diameter disc magnets.  You can get them online pretty cheap.  I usually have a hand drill with a small drill bit to make pilot holes and a large drill bit that is the size of the magnet (in this case 1/8th inch). For this particular project, I like to use picture hangers to make braces (you only need 4) as well as some side cutters to work them.  I also use a hobby knife to help clean up holes and place magnets (I use a scaple).  Super glue is great for fixing things in place, I also use an accelerator (zip kicker).

20150301_070437In terms of a drill, a lot of guys like dremel’s.  I am a bit more utilitarian, so I use my trusty power drill.  If you go that route, I have a tip for you.  Hold the drill still on a table and manipulate the piece you are drilling with the other hand.  Just be careful that you don’t drill your own fingers.  Plus large drills like this can have a lot of power, be careful!

20150301_065942 20150301_070007In terms of the landraider, assemble it into the above components.  Iron Hand doors are optional.  We are going to magnetize the weapon options to be interchangeable on the sponson and the sponson to the chassis.  I like the have the sponson removable for 2 reasons.  First, because my KR foam is designed for landrainders without sponsons.  The second is when a weapon is destroyed, I can remove it from the model.  Helps me remember.

20150301_070609First, take on of the picture hangers and trim it down with the side cutters. The bottom piece in the picture above is what we need.

20150301_070711

These pieces hold a magnet nicely!  Now we just need to mount them in the landraider.

20150301_070808I leaved a magnet on the metal piece and place it in the landraider (just place the magnets on the metal parts, don’t glue them, they are only space holders).  I then dry fit the sponson on to make sure the metal piece is at the right depth.  You can mark the edge with a marker to so you know where to glue it.

20150301_071303Repeat this process with the landraider upside down for a metal piece on the top of the mount.

20150301_071359Next, I paint a large amount of black paint onto the magnets.  You want a big puddle of it.

20150301_071451When you dry fit the sponson in again, it should mark areas the magnets contact.

20150301_071549Next I use the drill and 1/8th drill bit to drill into the back of the sponson.  All you need to do is make a slight hole so that the magent sits in it.  Don’t drill all the way through.

20150301_071728I then put a drop of glue in each hole.  I use the hobby knife to slide the magnets into the hole.  Polarity of the magnets is not important, they will be sticking to the metal brackets, not other magnets.  Then I use some accelerator to fix them in place.

20150301_071756Once everything is dry, you can test the sponson out.  Two magnets gives an adequate hold.  If you feel like you want more stability, add additional metal brackets and magnets.

20150301_181903Next up is the magnetizing the weapons to the sponsons.  First trim off the pegs from the main weapon support as seen on the right sponson above.

20150301_182033Drill a small pilot hole with the hand drill.  It doesn’t have to be all the way through.  Just enough to guide the 1/8th drill bit as it gets started.  The 1/8th inch hole goes completely through the support as shown above.

20150301_182140Next, I stack 2 magnets and place them in the hole.  Use super glue and accelerator as before.

20150301_182750Next up, drill all the components.  This is an easy step, most of the parts already have a whole that is close to the right size for our magnets.  Use the 1/8th inch drill bit to widen them enough to fit a magnet.

20150301_183221Organize the components into right and left sponsons.  This is the point where we need to make sure we get the polarity correct.  I put a small stack of magnets on each side of the center support.  It is important to get outside magnets on outside parts and inside on inside.  Mess this part up and it is a lot of work to get fixed.

20150301_183310Now we just take magnets from the appropriate side of the sponson support and insert them into the pre drilled pieces.

20150301_183634 20150301_183612Now we have weapon options that are interchangeable.  Next up the outside plate.

20150301_184223Drill and place magnets in the rectangular holes meant to accept the outside armor plate.  This part is a bit tricky, so go slow with the drill.

20150301_184259These are the inside of the outside armor plate.  We need to trim of the rectangular peg.

20150301_184334Shave the rough parts down smooth with a hobby knife.

20150301_184348Now we can use the left over metal brackets to make metal plates for the inside of the armored plate.

20150301_184439Trim them down with the side cutters to the shown size.

20150301_184534Now all you due is super glue the metal plates in place.

20150301_184754 20150301_184742Now we have a fully magnetized redeemer or crusader.  Now all you need is to scoop up the twin linked heavy bolter and the two twin linked lascannons from ebay and we can run all three options!

That about wraps up this tutorial.  Like I said before, vehicles are great things to start working with.  Large models mean larger magnets.  Larger magnets mean larger tools, so the job is a bit easier.  Infantry and monstrous creatures can be a bit trickier.  Regardless, if you take your time and put in the effort, you can really get some cool things done.  Until next time, this is Severus saying have a good one and take it easy!